Inverter Magnet Kit

£ 19.99
The basic principle that inverter magnets work upon is something encountered in the field of electrostatics, since the force exerted by one charge on another is inversely proportional to the distance between them squared, the force exerted by a small charge can exceed the force exerted by a large one, provided it is close enough. Using this principle it is possible to construct a structure where the distance from the centre determines whether the force is attractive or repulsive as different charges dominate at different radii. Such structures can be used to create electrostatic 'traps' in one or two dimensions, where a charged particle cannot leave without a certain amount of energy, including traps which are entirely outside the structure, created by making something that will attract when far away, and repel when close to. Unfortunately static charges are quite difficult to create, and easily dissipated, making a practical device hard to build. Magnets however are much easier to acquire, and their behaviour is governed by very similar laws.
The basic principle that inverter magnets work upon is something encountered in the field of electrostatics, since the force exerted by one charge on another is inversely proportional to the distance between them squared, the force exerted by a small charge can exceed the force exerted by a large one, provided it is close enough. Using this principle it is possible to construct a structure where the distance from the centre determines whether the force is attractive or repulsive as different charges dominate at different radii. Such structures can be used to create electrostatic 'traps' in one or two dimensions, where a charged particle cannot leave without a certain amount of energy, including traps which are entirely outside the structure, created by making something that will attract when far away, and repel when close to. Unfortunately static charges are quite difficult to create, and easily dissipated, making a practical device hard to build. Magnets however are much easier to acquire, and their behaviour is governed by very similar laws.